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Investments

Assessing Risk

By | Investments

It is common to have a very traditional interpretation when we think of investment risk, such as the belief that stocks are seen as a risky investment, and bonds less so. But many issues have come to light in the past decade that cause us to think about risk differently. For example, there’s the risk of outliving your retirement savings, which is often cited as one of the primary concerns of today’s retirees.1

And that’s just today’s retirees. If you’re still in saving mode, your retirement could be even longer than today’s average retirement.2 Given this potential reality, it may be time for all of us to re-evaluate how we assess risk.

As financial advisors, we spend countless hours helping people develop a financial strategy for the future. That means we continuously research and discuss risk factors, and we understand how to apply them to each individual’s situation. Please contact us if you’d like help assessing what risk factors you need to consider in regard to your long-term financial goals.

Some people are naturally risk averse, and others are enthusiastic risk-takers. Most fall somewhere in between, with attitudes toward risk changing, depending on where they are in in their lives. It’s not uncommon for individuals to take more risks in their younger years, when they have more time to rebound from market setbacks, and then take a more conservative approach as they near retirement.3

If we pursue a strict risk/reward investment strategy, we can still come up short in meeting retirement goals. For example, say you are extremely risk-averse, so you invest all of your money in 10-year Treasury notes in order to generate around $56,500, which is the average annual household income. These securities, which are considered low risk because they are backed by the U.S. government, were paying out around 2.25 percent in October, so you would need to have $2.26 million invested to earn that much – even more if you factor in long-term inflation.4 In this particular scenario, we might say that such a level of risk-aversion is a luxury many of us cannot afford.

Let’s look at another type of risk. As a general rule of thumb, risk-averse U.S. investors are more comfortable investing in domestic stocks versus those in other countries. This year, that’s working out pretty well, when you consider that the S&P 500 boasted a 14.86 percent year-to-date return as of Nov. 2, 2017.5 However, a lot of countries are doing well these days, so diversifying to include foreign stocks could help improve a portfolio’s overall return while adding the risk-mitigation factor of broader diversification. To put this in perspective, consider that the MSCI World ex USA Index has yielded 15.51 percent and the MSCI Emerging Markets Index is at 25.08 percent for the year as of Sept. 27, 2017.6

It’s also important to evaluate different kinds of risk beyond that associated with individual holdings. There’s the potential risk of not keeping pace with long-term inflation’s impact on the purchasing power of our savings. There’s what’s called “sequence of returns” risk, which means your average annual return over a long timeline may be good, but if you experience declines during the beginning of your retirement years, the risk of loss is much higher.7

There’s also the risk of having significant health problems and needing long-term care. Some people experience this while others don’t, but there’s no way to be sure which camp we’ll fall into – so that’s a potential risk.

While many retirees may believe that their greatest risk is not accumulating a certain amount of money by the time they retire, we believe their goal should be to create a financial strategy that reflects their needs and objectives instead of chasing an arbitrary monetary amount.

 

Content prepared by Kara Stefan Communications.

1 Catey Hill. MarketWatch. July 21, 2016. “Older People Fear This More Than Death.” http://www.marketwatch.com/story/older-people-fear-this-more-than-death-2016-07-18. Accessed Oct. 24, 2017.

2 Jeff Stimpson. Forbes. Sept. 5, 2017. “How to Balance Investment Risk and Reward in Retirement” https://www.forbes.com/sites/nextavenue/2017/09/05/how-to-balance-investment-risk-and-reward-in-retirement/#629608b96ec4. Accessed Sept. 28, 2017.

3 Walter Updegrave. CNN Money. June 21, 2017. “How much investing risk should you take in retirement? http://money.cnn.com/2017/06/21/pf/retirement-investing-risk/index.html. Accessed Oct. 24, 2017.

4 Bruce McCain. Forbes. Sept. 20, 2017. “Seeking Financial Security When Life Changes Strike.” https://www.forbes.com/sites/brucemccain/2017/09/20/seeking-financial-security-when-life-changes-strike/#589a300c2f0a. Accessed Sept. 28, 2017.

5 CNN Money. Oct. 24, 2017. “S&P 500 Index.” http://money.cnn.com/data/markets/sandp/. Accessed Nov. 2, 2017.

6 eTrade. Sept. 28, 2017. “International calling.” https://us.etrade.com/knowledge/markets-news/commentary-and-insights/international-calling?ch_id=S&s_id=Twitter&c_id=ESOC. Accessed Sept. 28, 2017.

7 Dana Anspach. The Balance. Aug. 14, 2017. “Learn How Sequence Risk Impacts Your Retirement Money.” https://www.thebalance.com/how-sequence-risk-affects-your-retirement-money-2388672. Accessed Oct. 24, 2017.

We are an independent firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance and investment products to custom suit their needs and objectives. This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic financial planning strategies and should not be construed as financial advice. All investments are subject to risk including the potential loss of principal. No investment strategy can guarantee a profit or protect against loss in periods of declining values. 

The information contained in this material is believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

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Investing for the Long Term

By | Investments

What does the phrase “long term” mean to you? For children, long term can mean waiting for Christmas or summer vacation that feels like a million years away. For young adults, long term may reference how long it takes to pay off student loans. As we get older, we begin to understand that long term can be a really long time – even decades. We may wonder where the years went. Suddenly we’re in our 50s, 60s, 70s or older. Long term tends to be a subjective phrase depending on what stage you have reached in life and what your goals are.

When it comes to investing, its meaning is only marginally clearer. In other words, if we’re encouraged to invest for the long term, how long is that – 10 years, 20, 30? It largely depends on what your financial goals are – a house, college tuition for the kids, retirement and so on. We take the time to help clients define their financial goals and then create strategies using a variety of investment and insurance products to custom suit their needs and objectives. Give us a call so we can work with you to help you pursue your long-term goals.

It’s worth noting that even an experienced investor can’t say for sure whether they’ve got the right mix of investments for the long term. Take, for example, Jack Bogle, the founder of The Vanguard Group. He recently responded to a question he received from a young investor concerned about how potential catastrophes would impact his portfolio. Bogle replied by sharing his own portfolio mix (50/50 indexed stocks and short/intermediate bond indexes) but said that half the time he worries that he has too much in equities, and the other half that he doesn’t have enough. “We’re all just human beings operating in a fog of ignorance and relying on our common sense to establish our asset allocation,” he wrote to the investor. 1

The S&P 500 has nearly quadrupled in annualized returns since its low in 2009.2 Several prominent market analysts and investment firms suggest this means it’s about time for a market downturn.3 The question is, if you’re a long-term investor, do you sell in anticipation of a correction? After all, if the point is to buy low and sell high, it makes sense to take gains while prices are at their highest before they begin to drop. Or does it?

That’s not what long-term investing is about. The reason returns over 30 years tend to outperform those from, say, five years, is that time is what typically smooths out those periods of volatility. If we continue investing automatically, we may end up buying during those periods of price drops and we can potentially make stronger gains as prices rise again.4

If we base our investment decisions on when the market will take a turn for the worse, we could end up missing out on the future gains that could have been made. Long-term investing may involve patience, unlike children who anxiously await the holidays.

Investing involves risk, including the potential loss of principal.  No investment strategy can guarantee a profit or protect against loss in periods of declining values. It’s important to consider any investment within the context of your own goals, risk tolerance, investment timeline and the composition of your overall portfolio. This information is not intended to provide investment advice.

 

Content prepared by Kara Stefan Communications.

1 Andy Clarke. Vanguard Blog for Advisors. July 12, 2017. “Stocks and the meaning of “long term.” https://vanguardblog.com/2017/07/12/stocks-and-the-meaning-of-long-term/. Accessed Oct. 12, 2017.

2 Joe Ciolli. Business Insider. Sept. 15, 2017. “An investing legend who’s nailed the bull market at every turn sees no end in sight for the 269% rally.” http://www.businessinsider.com/laszlo-birinyi-interview-investing-legend-bull-market-sage-2017-9. Accessed Sept. 19, 2017.

3 Paul J. Lim. Money. Sept. 19, 2017. “ ‘Unnerved’: These 5 Big Wall Street Players Are Predicting a Downturn.” http://time.com/money/4943479/wall-street-prediction-stock-market-downturn/. Accessed Sept. 19, 2017.

4 Maya Kachroo-Levine. Forbes. Sept. 18, 2017. “Should You Invest As Usual When Stocks Are This High?” https://www.forbes.com/sites/mayakachroolevine/2017/09/18/should-you-invest-as-usual-when-stocks-are-this-high/print/. Accessed Sept. 19, 2017.

This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic financial planning strategies and should not be construed as financial advice.

The information contained in this material is believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

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Goals-Based Investing

By | Investments

There’s a difference between monitoring an investment and checking its performance on a daily basis. Rather than being concerned about short-term volatility in the market, consider the future purpose or goal of what you want your money to pay for. This is the fundamental idea behind goals-based investing. You don’t just seek out investments that will yield a certain average annual return; you identify other factors that may matter more.1

In goals-based investing, it’s not about how much your investment earns; it’s about how much you need your investment to yield. For example, let’s say you need about $50,000 to pay for your child’s college education. You save diligently from the time he or she is 10 years old through his or her last year in college – 12 years. During that time, you save $37,000. Your investment needs to earn an additional $13,000. There are a lot of factors here that will determine your return, but the point is that your investment need not be overly aggressive to achieve the return you desire. It should reflect how much risk you’re willing to take to yield the amount you’ll need to pay for your child’s education. Not necessarily more. Preferably no less.

If the investment earns more, you can put those additional earnings in your retirement savings bucket. If it earns less, you may need to tighten the belt on your finances and use more current income to pay for expenses during those college years, or get aggressive about applying for loans and scholarships. The point is, an investment should align with a goal – including its timeline for when you’ll need the money. The timeline can help you determine how aggressively to invest. The longer you have to invest, the more risk you may be able to take.

Just as the timeline matters, so does your age. Young investors with a longer investment timeline usually can be more flexible at choosing riskier investments – as long as those risks are aligned with their goals.2

However, let’s say your last child came later in life. If you will turn 60 before he or she goes to college, you could consider saving for his or her college education via tax-deferred retirement plans. You can start tapping these funds after age 59 ½ and no longer be subject to an early withdrawal penalty, but keep in mind that distributions will be subject to income taxes at that point.

Defining each goal you want to achieve can help guide your investment strategy, which can include the type of account in which you invest, such as a tax-advantaged college savings account or a tax-deferred retirement account. Different goals may call for different types of accounts, so you may need to create an investment strategy for each individual goal and monitor several different types of investments.3

This is where we can help. We’ll work with you to define each goal, establish which type of plan is most appropriate and what types of investments suit your timeline and tolerance for market risk. Then, we’ll help monitor how well those investments stay on track as you work toward your financial goals.

When all of these factions are aligned, you can be less concerned about day-to-day fluctuations. If you think you need to save more, you might want to consider different ways you can generate additional income sources that will allow you to save and invest more.

Perhaps one of the most significant benefits to a goals-based approach is that it makes us think about what we want in life in very tangible terms. Suppose you want to retire to a coastal community. That’s your goal, and how early you get started saving and investing and at what age you’ll want your money can help determine your investment allocations. The return on that investment will ultimately decide how much house you can afford when retiring to your coastal destination. When creating your financial strategy, you should also consider the sort of lifestyle you want to provide your family and how expensive a college you want your children to attend. As with investment risk, trade-offs may need to be made in order to pursue your financial goals.

Investing involves risk, including the potential loss of principal. No investment strategy can guarantee a profit or protect against loss in periods of declining values. It’s important to consider any investment within the context of your own goals, risk tolerance, investment timeline and the composition of your overall portfolio. This information is not intended to provide investment advice.

 

Content prepared by Kara Stefan Communications.

 

1 Michael Finke. The American College. June 19, 2017. “The Philosophy of Goal-Based Investment Planning.” http://knowledge.theamericancollege.edu/blog/the-philosophy-of-goal-based-investment-planning. Accessed Aug. 30, 2017.

2 Amy Kemp and Dorsey Wright. NASDAQ. Aug. 3, 2017. “The Next Generation of Investors.” http://www.nasdaq.com/article/the-next-generation-of-investors-cm826808. Accessed Aug. 30, 2017.

3 Sunder R. Ramkumar and P. Brett Hammond. Forbes. April 10, 2017. “Goals-Based Investing: From Theory to Practice.” https://www.forbes.com/sites/pensionresearchcouncil/2017/04/10/goals-based-investing-from-theory-to-practice/#462b4018459d. Accessed Aug. 30, 2017.

 

We are an independent firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance and investment products to custom suit their needs and objectives. This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic financial planning strategies and should not be construed as financial advice.

The information contained in this material is believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

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Assessing Risk in Retirement Income

By | Investments

When it comes to investing, there’s no such thing as a “safe bet.” Every type of financial vehicle has some level of risk, even checking and savings accounts. Back in the 1920s, people believed that the safest place to keep their money was a bank, and they were right. But as they witnessed during the Great Depression, even those assets were not 100 percent safe. Bank runs caused banks to deplete their cash holdings, and they had to call in loans and liquidate assets to try to keep up with withdrawal demands, which subsequently led to bank failures.1 In response, the government created the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC), which insures deposits up to $250,000 per depositor, per FDIC-insured bank, per ownership category.2

Throughout history, bank deposit accounts have generally been considered the safest place to keep assets. However, today’s longer lifespans illustrate that risk takes many forms, including the potential risk of outliving your money if you don’t save enough, have a well-diversified financial portfolio to help outpace inflation and seek out multiple sources for reliable income streams. We can recommend a variety of strategies to help retirees pursue each of these goals, based on individual circumstances. Give us a call, and let’s discuss your options.

Consider even Social Security. The agency projects that by 2034, its Trust Fund will be reduced to the point where it can pay out only 74 percent of promised benefits to retirees. While it’s unlikely this safety net will collapse, Congress will need to take steps to keep the fund fully solvent.3

However, individuals who invest in 401(k)s should be aware that even if their company closes or goes bankrupt, vested 401(k) assets belong to the account owner; the employer or the employer’s creditors can’t touch them.4

Another factor that can potentially affect your retirement assets is the impact long-term inflation can have on cost of living expenses for people who spend 20 to 30 years or more in retirement. Inflation has remained low for many years, and some market experts believe that, as a result, many investors are not well-prepared for a resurgence of inflation.5

With the knowledge that investing offers the possibility of growth but also the risk of loss, it’s a good idea to consider working with a financial advisor to help tailor a financial portfolio to your specific goals, timeline and tolerance for different types of risk. Your financial advisor may also suggest annuities, and although they are not investments, some annuity contracts credit interest earnings that are linked to the performance of an external market index. These types of annuities, often referred to as fixed index annuities, offer a combination of higher interest growth potential and guaranteed income. The guarantees are backed by the insurance company so it’s important to check out the credit rating and financial strength and experience of the issuing insurer.

 

Content prepared by Kara Stefan Communications.

1 History.com. “Bank Run.” http://www.history.com/topics/bank-run. Accessed Aug. 6, 2017.

2 Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. June 3, 2014. “Deposit Insurance FAQs.” https://www.fdic.gov/deposit/deposits/faq.html. Accessed August 15, 2017.

3 Chris Farrell. Forbes/Next Avenue. June 24, 2016. “The Truth About Social Security’s Solvency And You.” https://www.forbes.com/sites/nextavenue/2016/06/24/the-truth-about-social-securitys-solvency-and-you/#2590b10b2199. Accessed Aug. 14, 2017.

4 Dana Anspach. The Balance. Nov. 22, 2016. “If My Company Closes, What Happens to My 401k?” https://www.thebalance.com/if-my-company-closes-what-happens-to-my-401k-2388225. Accessed Aug. 14, 2017.

5 Rebecca Ungarino. CNBC. Aug. 5, 2017. “Inflation isn’t stirring, but still the biggest risk to investors even as it’s ‘least apparent’: Brown Brothers.” https://www.cnbc.com/2017/08/05/with-inflation-dormant-investors-downplay-risks-to-the-economy.html. Accessed Aug. 6, 2017.

Investing involves risk, including the potential loss of principal. Any references to reliable income generally refer to fixed insurance products, never securities or investment products. Annuities are insurance products that may be subject to fees, surrender charges and holding periods which vary by company. Annuities are not a deposit of nor are they insured by any bank, the FDIC, NCUA, or by any federal government agency. Annuities are designed for retirement or other long-term needs.

We are an independent firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance and investment products to custom suit their needs and objectives. This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic financial planning strategies and should not be construed as financial advice.

The information contained in this material is believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

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Are We “Shovel-Ready”?

By | Investments

A famous line of dialogue came from the 1989 film “Field of Dreams”: “If you build it, he will come.” Perhaps the quote endures because of its inherent irony — it’s not always true. In fact, during the Obama Administration, there was an unfortunate lesson best illustrated by paraphrasing this quote: “If you fund it, it will get built.” Unfortunately, even President Obama was forced to concede that the 2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act’s $69 billion funding for “shovel-ready” infrastructure improvements was ill conceived.1

The problem? With provisions requiring project funding to be committed within about a year and a half of passage of the bill, not enough attention was paid to the time-consuming myriad of bidding, design and approval processes that caused inevitable delays.2

That’s one thing about short-term planning: It seldom leads to long-term success. For example, if you need a new roof on your home, it may be better to invest in a high-quality roof replacement that will last the rest of your life. If you opt to pay for a cheaper “patch job,” you may end up having to replace the whole roof later. Big projects like that could cause stress on your retirement savings, especially toward the latter years of retirement. If you’d like help planning and budgeting for big and small expenses in retirement, please give us a call. 

According to President Trump’s latest bill, his promised U.S.-Mexico border wall is to be an integral part of America’s infrastructure. That’s because in March, the president called for immediate budget cuts of $18 billion from a variety of programs in order to put a down payment on construction of the border wall.3 Programs with proposed cuts in his budget include the Transportation Investment Generating Economic Recovery (TIGER) grant program, a popular infrastructure funding tool for cities and states.4

While that proposed budget has little chance of being passed in its current form, it may be worth pondering what the new administration considers to be viable infrastructure projects during its tenure. It has been reported that Trump is prioritizing “shovel-ready” projects to begin within 90 days of passing an infrastructure funding bill.5

Some investment analysts are excited about Trump’s infrastructure plans, many of which are slated to be privately funded. In fact, given the White House’s propensity toward deregulation, it may forge a path for more predictable, streamlined regulatory processes to facilitate expediting new projects.6

Trump’s team put together an infrastructure wish list early on in his budget proposal process. The inventory includes a vast array of interesting options, such as Project Clean Lake in Cleveland, an Atlantic coast pipeline for natural gas and a satellite-based next-gen air traffic control system.7

 

 

 

Content prepared by Kara Stefan Communications

1 Mark Niquette. Bloomberg. March 2, 2017. “Trump’s $1 Trillion Infrastructure Dream Faces the Same Old Nightmares.” https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-03-02/trump-s-1-trillion-infrastructure-dream-faces-the-same-old-nightmares. Accessed March 28, 2017.

2 Ibid.

3 Andrew Taylor. Chicago Tribune. March 28, 2017. “White House calls for domestic cuts to finance border wall.” http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/politics/ct-mexico-border-wall-cost-funding-20170328-story.html. Accessed March 28, 2017.

4 Melanie Zanona. The Hill. March 12, 2017. “Infrastructure grants could be on chopping block in Trump budget.” http://thehill.com/policy/transportation/323287-infrastructure-grants-could-be-on-chopping-block-in-trump-budget. Accessed March 28, 2017.

5 Maxwell Tani. Business Insider. March 25, 2017. “‘Seems like it’s going to be about his corporate cronies’: Environmental groups fret over Trump’s infrastructure plan.” http://www.businessinsider.com/environmental-impact-trumps-infrastructure-plan-2017-3. Accessed March 28, 2017.

6 Diana Britton. Wealth Management. Feb. 1, 2017. “Are We Entering the Golden Age of Infrastructure?” http://www.wealthmanagement.com/alternative-investments/are-we-entering-golden-age-infrastructure. Accessed March 28, 2017.

7 President-elect Trump. Dec. 14, 2016, “Emergency & National Security Projects.” https://assets.documentcloud.org/documents/3409546/Emergency-NatSec50Projects-121416-1-Reduced.pdf. Accessed March 28, 2017.

We are an independent firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance and investment products to custom suit their needs and objectives. This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic financial planning strategies and should not be construed as financial advice. All investments are subject to risk including the potential loss of principal. No investment strategy can guarantee a profit or protect against loss in periods of declining values. 

The information contained in this material is believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

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Thought for the Week: Becoming Comfortable With Uncomfortable Investments

By | Investments

BUY LOW, SELL HIGH

The adage to “buy low and sell high” sounds like an obvious path to building a large nest egg. The premise is as simple as it gets. All that is required is to buy stocks cheap, sell them when they become expensive, and repeat until rich.

The problem is that executing such a strategy is extremely difficult to pull off on a consistent basis. Knowing when a stock is cheap or expensive requires expert-level skills in accounting, finance, and valuation techniques along with a thorough understanding of an investment’s competitive landscape.

The best stock pickers spend years in school and cut their teeth on far more losers than winners as they fine tune their analytical processes. They then compete with other stock pickers armed with a similar toolkit, so they must also have access to superior information or see something that their competition is missing to profit over the long run.

Therefore, I find this proverbial advice to be useless because of the difficulty in implementation, but that does not mean that investors should wing it or avoid stock ownership altogether. In fact, the following chart highlights an investment strategy that any investor can execute. Click here to read more. 

 

Thought for the Week: Should Investors Sell All Their Bonds?

By | Investments | No Comments

THE COMING BLOODBATH

It seems as if we cannot go a day without hearing about the impending destruction of the bond market as interest rates continue to move higher. I have lost count of the number of email newsletters I have received warning that it will be a “bloodbath” in bonds. Let’s quickly run through some bond math to see why the fearmongering has become so vocal on the subject.

A bond represents a “fixed” income stream over time. If an investor buys a $100 bond that yields 5%, then they will receive $5 in income each year for the duration of the bond. Assuming no default, this $5 payment will never change.

What does change is the price. If our investor decided that they no longer wanted to own this bond, they could sell it to someone else. Like most things, the value of this bond will change over time based on how attractive it looks to a potential buyer.

One big driver of value is the yield relative to other bonds available to buy. For example, if a year goes by from the original time of purchase, and similar bonds now offer 4% yield, then the older bond paying 5% is more attractive to a buyer because it offers $1 more income ($5 – $4 = $1). Since the bond has more value, the owner of the bond could sell it for a higher price than what they paid.

However, if similar bonds are now paying 6%, then the older bond is going to be worth less because these newer bonds are the ones offering more income. This is the crux of the fear mongers’ argument.

They believe that since interest rates will likely rise for several years, current bond prices have nowhere to go but down. Technically speaking, they are correct. Rising interest rates do make older bonds less attractive. However, I strongly disagree that the solution is to sell all bonds for three reasons. Click here to read more.

Thought For The Week: The Amazing Power of Dividend Growth

By | Investments | No Comments

DIVIDEND PAYING STOCKS DOMINATE Those who own stocks that pay dividends have voiced concern over the volatility experienced over the last few months, and some have even asked if they should move out of them until things calm down a bit.

Before we discuss the merits of such a strategy, let’s get a sense of why dividend-paying stocks are owned by analyzing their returns over the long run. Click to read more. 

Thought for the Week: Should Investors Consider Going Passive?

By | Investments | No Comments

Should Investors Consider Going Passive?

The decision to either actively or passively invest remains one of the longest running financial debates. The media has recently amplified the drama by televising regular stand offs between those for and against active management that rival the crudeness and civil disobedience witnessed in last year’s presidential debates. Click to read more.